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New books for kids in need.

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What is it about banned books that make us want to read them even more?
Here’s a list of titles for young readers that have been challenged or banned.
The Giver By Lois Lowry. “Violence” and claims that the book is too dark for children are two reasons this title about a young man’s coming-of-age in a dystopian future has been challenged.
Charlotte’s WebBy E.B. White. As recently as 2006, <SPOiLER ALERT> passages about the spider dying were criticized as being “inappropriate subject matter for a children’s book.”
The Wizard of OzBy L. Frank Baum. This classic title was banned from libraries in Detroit for having “no value” for children and supporting “negativism.”
Charlie & the Chocolate FactoryBy Roald Dahl. In the early 1970s, this delicious classic was labeled as “tasteless.”
Bridge to TerabithiaBy Katherine Paterson. This title was challenged because of claims that it promoted witchcraft and violence.
Where the Wild Things AreBy Maurice Sendak. Some parents claimed this title was too dark and disturbing for young children, and would cause nightmares.
Harriet the SpyBy Louise Fitzhugh. Precocious Harriet was kept out of some schools and libraries “because it was said to set a bad example for children”.
The LoraxBy Dr. Seuss. This beloved children’s book was challenged in California because it was argued it would persuade children against the logging industry.
Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time IndianBy Sherman Alexie. This title about a14-year-old American Indian who leaves his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white high school was pulled from school curricula because it uses graphic language and describes sexual acts.
« HAPPY BANNED BOOK WEEK! »

What is it about banned books that make us want to read them even more?

Here’s a list of titles for young readers that have been challenged or banned.

The Giver
By Lois Lowry. “Violence” and claims that the book is too dark for children are two reasons this title about a young man’s coming-of-age in a dystopian future has been challenged.

Charlotte’s Web
By E.B. White. As recently as 2006, <SPOiLER ALERT> passages about the spider dying were criticized as being “inappropriate subject matter for a children’s book.”

The Wizard of Oz
By L. Frank Baum. This classic title was banned from libraries in Detroit for having “no value” for children and supporting “negativism.”

Charlie & the Chocolate Factory
By Roald Dahl. In the early 1970s, this delicious classic was labeled as “tasteless.”

Bridge to Terabithia
By Katherine Paterson. This title was challenged because of claims that it promoted witchcraft and violence.

Where the Wild Things Are
By Maurice Sendak. Some parents claimed this title was too dark and disturbing for young children, and would cause nightmares.

Harriet the Spy
By Louise Fitzhugh. Precocious Harriet was kept out of some schools and libraries “because it was said to set a bad example for children”.

The Lorax
By Dr. Seuss. This beloved children’s book was challenged in California because it was argued it would persuade children against the logging industry.

Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian
By Sherman Alexie. This title about a14-year-old American Indian who leaves his school on the Spokane Indian Reservation to attend an all-white high school was pulled from school curricula because it uses graphic language and describes sexual acts.

« HAPPY BANNED BOOK WEEK! »

Filed under Banned Books book list banned books week freadom roald dahl Dr. Seuss The Giver maurice sendak Where The Wild Things Are

28 notes

Hispanic Heritage Month First Book Tweet Chat

Thank you to all who participated in our chat!

ICYMI here’s the recap of our Hispanic Heritage Month conversation - including activity ideas, book recommendations, and links to resources for further exploration.

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When: September 22, 2014 at 2:30p EST

What:  An hour-long conversation for partners and friends of First Book to share the activities they’ve planned to honor and celebrate Hispanic Heritage Month.

Filed under education literacy diversity learning hispanic heritage month celebrations lesson plans

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Make your own dot on the world!
Author &amp; Illustrator Peter H. Reynolds created International Dot Day to celebrate creativity.
Today is International Dot Day, but celebrations go on through October! If you need some inspiration of how to celebrate, grab a copy of the book &amp; checkout http://www.thedotclub.org/dotday/
This picture, along with many amazing dots, was found here.

Make your own dot on the world!

Author & Illustrator Peter H. Reynolds created International Dot Day to celebrate creativity.

Today is International , but celebrations go on through October! If you need some inspiration of how to celebrate, grab a copy of the book & checkout

This picture, along with many amazing dots, was found here.

Filed under International dot day peter h reynolds kidlit creativity creative prompts start small dream big